Monthly Archives: November 2012

Manage Your Energy & Your Choices (Be a Better Self-Manager)

Now there’s a thought?! As you plan your day and week, try evaluating the options and choices you have, and take into consideration the energy you need/want for each task.

We all know what it feels like to be stressed about “time”. You know, too many things to do and not enough time to do them in. If this sounds like you right now, you might be trying too hard to micro-manage every hour, often overfilling your schedule. This is a sure-fire way to set yourself up for frustration and disappointment, versus success.

Managing your choices and assessing wisely the energy and focus you need is a much more realistic and useful approach. You will be more inclined to have a better perspective on how much time you will really need to allot for each appointment or “to do” item on your list.  You will also quickly see the value of creating a cushion over the course of your day, to allow for the meeting that runs a little later or the road repairs that tie up traffic unexpectedly right in the middle of your day.

More positives:

•  The breathing space in your day will help you think more clearly, and recognize opportunities that you might have otherwise missed (being distracted by all that you still had to do).

•  Remaining in the moment will show more respect to others you are engaging with, and definitely give you more joy and respect in return too.

There are still a couple of other significant challenges people can face. Have you ever added tasks to your day just randomly (in reaction mode) without checking and prioritizing with your existing commitments? Or perhaps you added ones that shouldn’t have been there to begin with (i.e. those tasks belonged on someone else’s list)? I’m not saying that these things should never happen; there’s just a lot of wisdom in doing so with more thought than is often given.

To help you get a better sense of where your time is going and provide you a quick and easy way to see where you can tweak things, I encourage you to do what I call a Wellness Journal for one week.

 

From my book, Working From Home & Making It Work©

I initially created the Wellness Journal to help my clients and colleagues get a handle on their use of time—or as often was the case—get a handle on how and who else was using or consuming their time. As with many other tools I have developed or passed on from my mentors, the Wellness Journal has become an amazing exercise that I utilize regularly.

 

It’s very simple, and you can customize it the way you see fit for your particular circumstances. Detail is helpful, but not to the point where it will inhibit you from following through with the process.

 

Every one of us has 168 hours in our week, that’s 7 days times 24 hours.

 

I encourage you to pick a relatively normal week you can commit to—and write, type or record in some way, all that makes up your day. Note everything you do for yourself, for your friends, family, work, etc.

 

Quite likely, well before the week is up, you will see some areas that you can make adjustments in, to help things run more efficiently and productively.

Here’s to your success!

 

_______

 

 

This week’s guest blog is by Sheri Andrunyk, on Managing Your Energy & Your Choices, more insights of which you’ll find in her new book, Working from Home and Making it Work.

 

Sheri Andrunyk is Master Practitioner of Neuro-Linguistic Programming, Inspiring Speaker, Holistic Business and Life Coach, Author and Publisher. Her specialty is working with small business owners and entrepreneurs.

 

 

She has a passion for all forms of meaningful communication, and has expertise in providing invaluable guidance to her clients, colleagues, and community.

 

Sheri’s new book Working from Home and Making it Work discusses time and choice management, work/life balance and shares powerful insights on how we can become better self-managers, an essential component to success.

 

 

 

For more information and to download a free chapter, please visit

 

www.insightfulcommunications.ca

 

Recruitment On A Shoestring

Recruitment for a small business owner is incredibly important to get it right the first time, because you cannot afford to hire someone who doesn’t fit in or who doesn’t add value relatively quickly.  A second challenge is that a small business owner doesn’t have the budget to get 100s of applicants.  Without the right recruitment strategy, they might not get any applicants or none of the right ones.

 

As recruitment is so critical for a small business, this video is important in outlining how to do it correct…on a shoe string.

4 Conversations Of A Leader

Building rapport and having great conversations with customers, suppliers, employees, and everyone else you do business with is critical for sustainable growth. Plus better conversations can help build your referral base and your external sales force, a great thing to have as a small business.

 

Learn how to have better conversations for small business (and big business) success.

 

The subject matter expert is Stuart Knight, of www.stuartknightproductions.com

Social SEO

SEO (Search Engine Optimization) is constantly changing.  Why?  Google, Yahoo, Bing, and other search engines are constantly updating how websites are ranked so that their customers, the people searching, are finding what they want to find rather than what businesses are trying to put in front of them.

 

Find out some of the latest ways that search engines are ranking websites.  This is presented by Knight, Bishop, Queen, a social media and small business consulting firm.

 

Small Business Accounting, Bookkeeping, & Financial Basics That Save Money (CANADA)

Keeping up with your taxes and bookkeeping can feel like a full-time job. Especially in the first few years when the learning curve is steep on what to do and what you shouldn’t do in regards to your paperwork.

Jeff Dessau, a Chartered Accountant with over 25 years experience in Canada, goes through what is critical to saving money as an entrepreneur.

 

Want to learn more?  Contact the subject matter expert;

 

Jeff Dessau

[email protected]